Most Anticipated Books for the Second Half of 2017

By Christina Ladd on

About Christina Ladd

One of the Books & Comics editors at Geekly. She/her. Sailor Rainbow. Glitter and spite and everything bright.

 

We’ve survived half a year beyond 2016! What an accomplishment, and what better way to celebrate than to look yet further forward. Deliberately without an order of preference and in order of release, here are my most anticipated titles of the coming six months.

  1. Wicked Like a Wildfire – Since magic is so often utilitarian or results-based, I always look forward to the possibility of it having an emotional or aesthetic component. Popovic’s debut promises to tell us about a family that can manipulate beauty. What does that mean, and what will it say more broadly about power? Less than a month until we know… (Aug 15)
  2. The Dazzling Heights – This glitzy world had a lot of depth, and now that all the secrets and lies have the added weight of death, addiction, illegal tech, and forbidden romance, I anticipate things getting even more thrilling. (Aug 29)
  3. One Dark Throne – I would have given Three Dark Crowns a standing ovation just for its refusal to use that tired, tired standard of magic, the four elements. Instead we have war, poison, flora and fauna to join the elemental manipulation, and three very clever girls to use these gifts and more. I really don’t know how it’ll end and I can’t wait to find out. (Sept 19)
  4. An Enchantment of Ravens – Done right, the fair folk are delightful and terrible. Done wrong, they’re insipid. Focusing on their heartlessness gives me hope that this will be a magnificent portrait of the fey and the people they entrance. (Sept 26)
  5. Language of Thorns – This one is partially cheating on my part, since I’ve already read half the stories. They’re gloriously dark and wicked and clever. I fully expect the others to be excellent as well. (Sept 26)
  6. Forest of a Thousand Lanterns – I’m so happy that YA publishers are listening to readers about diversity and inclusion, which means we get awesome stories like this one, about a girl who will become Empress if she can find enough cruelty within herself. An atypical (anti-)heroine in an atypical setting (for now), this one has enormous potential. (Oct 10)
  7. Turtles all the Way Down – Same deal for the new John Green: can anything live up to the hype of The Fault in Our Stars? I’m sure this one will be whimsical and witty, but will it make me gross-sob at three in the morning? I hope so! (Oct 10)
  8. Skinful of Shadows – Everything Hardinge writes is far subtler and more terrible than I can imagine going in (in the best possible way), and I’m sure this will be the same. (Oct 17)
  9. The Book of Dust: La Belle Sauvage – Is Pullman returning to the world of The Golden Compass because he’s tapped out, or because—like me—he can’t get enough? Will it be a tiresome diatribe or a sparkling vision? My faith is at war with my fear. But the last time he took forever to complete something it was The Amber Spyglass, and that’s one of the most moving and wonderful books of all time. So I’m on the side of faith (and yes, I realize the irony of that statement with regard to a Philip Pullman book). (Oct 19)
  10. Malice of Crows – Rhett, with his increasingly complicated love life in tow (now including a definitely-not-immaculate pregnancy!), is off in pursuit of a body-swapping sorcerer. Dawson knows a thing about anger and about pain, and this series has deep reservoirs of insight as well as frequent action to recommend it. Should be a hell of a ride. (Oct 31)
  11. Girl in the Tower – Her first book was a paean to rural Russian life and belief. Now that Vasilisa is on the road, I expect just as much detail and complexity for her characters and her settings. (Dec 5)
  12. The Forever Ship – The concluding volume of Haig’s post-apocalyptic trilogy will be a quiet storm, if the other two are any indication. (Dec 5)

2 comments

  1. Regarding #9, Pullman has been discussing and working on The Book of Dust for *years.* It was already in the works when I studied HDM for my thesis six years ago; it’s not an uninspired return to what’s old because he’s out of ideas. That’s no guarantee it will be great, of course, but it has been a long-term labor that’s actually been set aside more than once to put out non-HDM-related books along the way.

  2. “Working on for years” and “uninspired return” are not mutually exclusive. I am not unaware of its lengthy gestation.

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